History

Race Yourself to the Finish Line With This 50’s to 60’s Car Quiz

These cars have been around for many years and can be worth millions. Test your knowledge about 50s and 60s cars and see how many of these classics can you identify.

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The second-generation model displayed here had a tough act to follow as one of the first four-door hardtop vehicles ever made; the model’s initial iteration was one of the first production cars capable of achieving 100 mph.

Buick Century Riviera

Dodge Ram

Jaguar E-Type

Porsche 911 Carrera

Buick Century Riviera
The Buick Century Riviera was a four-door version of the groundbreaking first-generation Century, which was one of the first production Buicks to surpass 100 mph.

This shown little model, like its European cousin, the Renault 4CV, was a pioneer in the economy and subcompact automobile segments.

Hudson Rambler

Nash Metropolitan

Ford Focus

Buick Electra

Nash Metropolitan
Following the Nash-Hudson merger in 1954, the Nash Metropolitan was also sold as a Hudson. During the Rambler era, it was later sold as a separate marque.

This model, which debuted in 1951, was equally successful on the road and on the track, winning the majority of NASCAR races from 1952 to 1954. The car’s luxury credentials were perhaps the most impressive aspect of this performance.

Ford Mustang

Dodge Hellcat

Hudson Hornet

Cadillac Sixty Special

Hudson Hornet
The Hudson Hornet had a 5.0-liter six-cylinder engine and could achieve speeds of 112 mph. Marshall Teague raced in a Hornet and won 12 of the 13 planned events during the 1952 AAA season, putting him 1000 points ahead of his nearest competitor.

In 1963, this personal luxury car was debuted as the automaker’s flagship model. Apart from 1994, it was produced for eight generations before being decommissioned in 1999.

Pontiac Firebird

Lincoln Continental

Mercury Marauder

Buick Riviera

Buick Riviera
During its 36-year career, over 1,100,000 Buick Rivieras were sold, solidifying its position as one of the best-selling luxury cars of all time.

Beginning in 1963, two versions of this ultra-luxury car were produced: a short wheelbase and a long wheelbase model. What’s the difference? The vehicle with the large wheelbase was designed to be chauffeured.

Imperial Crown Ghia

Mercedes-Benz 600

BMW 2500

Bentley Mulsanne

Mercedes-Benz 600
Only 2,677 Mercedes-Benz 600s were made between 1963 and 1981, making it the precursor of the Maybach.

What is there left to say about this legendary racer that hasn’t already been said? It is still the only automobile designed and constructed in the United States to have won the 24 Hours of Le Mans, which it achieved in 1967.

Oldsmobile 442

Chevy Corvette 427

Ford GT40

Pontiac Grand Prix

Ford GT40
From 1964 to 1969, the legendary Ford GT40 was produced in a number of special editions.

For the years 1955 and 1956, this model was the full-sized flagship offering of its manufacturer. This model’s appearance was distinguished by extra chrome and two-tone paint, as well as a unique three-tier instrument cluster on the inside.

Studebaker President

Chevrolet Impala

Mercury Montclair

Lincoln Premiere

Mercury Montclair
In 1957, the Mercury Montclair was supplanted as the top dog by the Turnpike Cruiser. The Sun Valley car, which had a Plexiglas bubble over the front half of the roof piece, was also part of its portfolio.

This two-seater was the first production car capable of exceeding 200 kilometers per hour (124 mph). It was in production from 1948 to 1954.

Mercedes SS 100

Jaguar XK120

Shelby Cobra

Fiat Leon

Jaguar XK120
The Jaguar XK120 held the production car speed record until 1955, when the Mercedes 300SL surpassed it. It was Jaguar’s first sports car since the production of the SS 100 ended in 1940.

In 1965, a limited quantity of this race-focused muscle automobile were released. All ’65 vehicles were painted white with blue stripes and had a 4-speed manual transmission that produced 306 horsepower.

Shelby GT350

Oldsmobile 442

Plymouth Barracuda

Ford GT40

Shelby GT350
Until 1966, the Shelby GT350 was still referred to as a “Mustang GT350.” They were also referred to as “Cobras.”

Apart from the Corvette, this performance-oriented beast was the only GM automobile with an engine larger than 400 cubic inches. In the 1968 model, the Rocket V8 produced 390 horsepower.

Oldsmobile Hurst/Olds

Pontiac Tempest GTO

Plymouth GTX

Shelby GT500

Oldsmobile Hurst/Olds
According to one version of the Hurst/Olds origin story, Oldsmobile was enraged by GM’s refusal to offer Lansing its own F-body pony car.

Chevy Camaro

Ford Mustang

Dodge Challenger

Lincoln Continental

Dodge Challenger
The Dodge Challenger was offered with a 6.3 Liter V8 engine capable of producing 290 horsepower. Mitsubishi produced the Challenger from 1978 until 1983.

In 1965, this model sold 1,074,925 units, making it not just the best-selling model of the year (or decade), but also the best-selling American model year of all time.

Oldsmobile Cutlass

Ford Fairlane

Ford Mustang

Chevy Impala

Chevy Impala
Over the previous 50 years, the Impala has been a consistent best-seller, selling more than a million copies in 1966 and 265,000 in 2008.

What model debuted as a sub-series of the Belvedere in 1955 before becoming a distinct nameplate in 1959? It was at the top of the list and came in a “Sport” variant as well.

Mercury Cougar

Plymouth Fury

Ford Thunderbird

Studebaker President

Plymouth Fury
The Plymouth Fury was available with a big 6 liter V8 engine as an option. The Fury also features as part of an automotive love triangle in Stephen King’s ‘Christine.’

This manufacturer has always been at the forefront of luxury features, so it’s no surprise that this model was the first to provide automated climate control. What’s surprising is the year: this functionality was first made available in 1964.

Chrysler 300K

Cadillac Series 75

Rolls Royce Silver Cloud

Imperial LeBaron

Cadillac Series 75
All of these elements together resulted in a car that was incredibly heavy. When empty, the 1964 Cadillac Series 75 weighed in at a remarkable 5,600 pounds.

The first ever tilt and telescopic steering wheel, as well as an updated Turbo-Hydromatic Automatic Transmission, were added to the 1965 model year of this premium automobile.

Lincoln Versailles

Imperial LeBaron

Cadillac Sixty Special

Chevrolet Fleetline

Cadillac Sixty Special
From 1937 until 1993, the Cadillac Sixty Special was offered in a number of body designs.

This 2-door top-end model shot to 60 mph in 5.3 seconds when fitted with the optional 7.0 426 “Commando” engine, making it one of the quickest vehicles of the decade in 1966.

AMC Javelin

Oldsmobile Toronado

Plymouth Satellite

Buick GNX

Plymouth Satellite
This is the first-generation Satellite, which was produced between 1965 and 1967.

This 1953 model defined luxury and sat at the pinnacle of GM’s premium portfolio for years. The front Dagmar bumpers, which were inspired by the 1951 Le Sabre concept car, are iconic stylistic elements. It was spanking new and cost $7,750.

Buick Roadmaster

Cadillac Eldorado

Oldsmobile 98

Chrysler Imperial

Cadillac Eldorado
Beginning in 1954, when it shared a body with other Cadillacs, the Cadillac Eldorado (officially the Series 62 Eldorado) grew increasingly popular.

This classic model, widely regarded as the most beautiful car of all time, combines luxury and performance. It wasn’t only gorgeous to look at: the top speed was above 150 mph, and the 0-60 speeds were under seven seconds.

Aston Martin DB5

Bentley Continental

Jaguar E-Type

Rolls Royce Phantom

Jaguar E-Type
The Jaguar E-Type was built between 1961 and 1975.

This automaker mistake, which occurred between 1957 and 1960, cost the manufacturer about $250 million due to the model’s unpopularity.

Dodge Nova

Chevrolet Corvair

Ford Edsel

Buick Electra

Ford Edsel
The Edsel was supposed to fall between Ford and Mercury in terms of price. The price and “horsecollar” style turned off customers. It’s pretty much been the subject of gearhead jokes since then.

This car made history in 1957 by becoming the first production car to include a retractable hardtop. Just for the hardtop, the system included seven motors and 510 feet of cabling.

Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner

Studebaker Commander

Plymouth Valiant

Mercury Montclair

Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner
When folded down, Ford’s Skyliner top took up virtually all of the trunk space, but the automobile received more press than sales and was only made from 1957 to 1959.

Since 1981, this renowned truck series has been America’s best-selling vehicle, and it is still in production today. This is a second-generation model, which was released in 1953 and follows the same model-numbering procedures as the first.

Ford F-Series

Chevrolet Silverado

Dodge Ram

GMC C/K

Ford F-Series
Since the late 1940s, the Ford F-Series has sold an incredible 27 million trucks. The F-150, now in its twelfth generation, is the company’s most popular vehicle.

In 1966, the first year of its debut, this full-sized vehicle was the first to provide a full stereo as an option. This first-generation model was manufactured till 1970.

Oldsmobile Toronado

Chevrolet Caprice

Buick LeSabre

Ford Torino GT

Chevrolet Caprice
The Chevy Caprice is also remarkable for being the 100 millionth car manufactured by General Motors. In April of 1967, it rolled off the assembly line.

This vehicle defined American luxury when it was introduced in 1956, and it was the most expensive American car on the market at the time. The spare tire bulge in the trunk of the “Mark II” was a carryover from pre-war stylistic elements.

Hudson Commodore

Buick Riviera

Lincoln Continental

Cadillac Sixty Special

Lincoln Continental
The Lincoln Continental cost roughly $10,000, about the same as a Rolls-Royce from the 1950s. This type is still on the market today.

In 1960, this lavish model was the most costly automobile on the market in the United States. The 1959 model’s showy fins were toned down a bit, but the interior was packed with cutting-edge technologies like the Autronic Eye and Cruise Control.

Ford GT40

Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

Lincoln Continental Mark III

Buick Century

Cadillac Eldorado Brougham
Pininfarina, the famous Italian coachbuilder, put together the Eldorado Brougham. In 1960, one cost $13,075, more than twice the price of a normal Eldorado of the same year.

In 1954, this top-of-the-line convertible was introduced as a special trimline. The moniker was extended to all of this manufacturer’s top-end vehicles in 1957 due to the model’s popularity.

Mercury Grand Marquis

Plymouth Valiant

Ford Fairlane

Oldsmobile Starfire

Oldsmobile Starfire
The Starfire started off as a trimline for the 98 before becoming a separate model in 1960. From 1961 through 1965, it was Oldsmobile’s most expensive model.

This well-known vehicle will be familiar to muscle car enthusiasts. It was first offered as an option package in 1964, then became its own model from 1968 to 1971.

Plymouth Road Runner

Ford GT40

Oldsmobile 442

Chevy Camaro

Oldsmobile 442
The 442 was originally offered as an option package on the F-85 and Cutlass models, but it proved to be so popular that it was spun off into its own vehicle. It gets its name from the 4-barrel carburetor, 400 cubic inch motor, and dual exhausts that came standard.

This simple model debuted in 1967 and quickly became a worldwide sensation in the 1970s. It surpassed the Beetle as the best-selling nameplate of all time in 1997.

Honda Civic

Toyota Corolla

Honda Accord

Kia Pride

Toyota Corolla
Over eleven generations, the Corolla has sold over 40 million units.

Lincoln Continental Mark IV

Bentley R-Type Continental

Buick Crown Regal

Chrysler 300 “letter series”

Lincoln Continental Mark IV
From 1958 to 1960, the Continental Mark IV was part of the third generation of Continentals. Designer Editions were debuted as an option series on the Mark IV, and they would become a staple of the Lincoln model range for many years to come.

This type, like its illustrious descendant, became famous as the very first “Bond automobile” in 1964’s Goldfinger. Between 1963 and 1965, just over 1,000 were made.

Rolls Royce Phantom

Bentley Flying Spur

Aston Martin DB5

Saab 95

Aston Martin DB5
The Aston Martin DB5 was the fifth series of cars named after David Brown, the company’s founder.

As a result of Anglo-American cooperation, this classic vehicle debuted in 1962. The V8 engine in this 2000-pound supercar, a modified version of which is still in production today, was donated by Ford. It is thought to be the quickest car ever built in the 1960s.

Austin-Healey Sprite

Ford Mustang

AC Cobra

Plymouth Road Runner

AC Cobra
The Shelby Cobra was the name given to the AC Cobra in the United States. Shelby later released special drag and race models, such as the “Dragon Snake” and the “Slalom Snake.”

Despite its amusingly low power output of 40-50 horsepower in the early/mid 1960s, it was remarkably dependable and is still the best-selling automobile of all time.

Toyota Corolla

Honda Civic

Volkswagen Beetle

Nissan Sentra

Volkswagen Beetle
The Beetle is the longest-running and most-manufactured automobile of a single platform, with 21,529,464 produced.

This personal luxury vehicle earned the 1966 Motor Trend Car of the Year Award when it was introduced, making it historically noteworthy as the first model with front wheel drive since the 1930s.

Ford Thunderbird

Aston Martin DB5

Oldsmobile Toronado

Mercury Cougar

Oldsmobile Toronado
Until 1992, the Oldsmobile Toronado was available in a number of body designs. Its name seems like a meteorological phenomenon, but it is actually just a meaningless term that sounds interesting.

Despite being the brand’s “entry-level” model, this premium vehicle began at roughly $5,000 and had equipment such as power brakes, steering, and automatic gearbox.

Lincoln Continental

Cadillac Calais

Chrysler LeBaron

Buick Electra

Cadillac Calais
The Cadillac Calais was manufactured until 1976, when it was superseded by the Seville.

In 1964, this Mustang challenger was two weeks ahead of its more famous relative on the market. It was produced for three generations before succumbing to the 1974 oil crisis.

Pontiac Grand Prix

Buick Electra

Plymouth Barracuda

Mercury Cougar

Plymouth Barracuda
The Plymouth Barracuda was available with a variety of engines, ranging from a 3.2 L V8 to a huge 7.2 L V8.

What was the name of the first hardtop station wagon, which debuted in 1955? This car effectively created a new market segment that would go on to become a best-seller in the future: the “compact” car.

Nash Rambler

Ford Starliner

Plymouth Valiant

Mercury Cougar

Nash Rambler
In their initial year of production, the small Ramblers sold over 60,000 units, establishing a niche that the Big Three were slow to fill. In 1954, American Motors completed the project.

What cutting-edge vehicle was the first ever to feature an alternator, debuting in 1959 for the 1960 model year?

Plymouth Valiant

Ford Starliner

Cadillac Eldorado

Buick Estate

Plymouth Valiant
The Plymouth Valiant was part of the expanding small car class, and ‘Road & Track Magazine’ named it “one of the best all-around domestic automobiles.”

This iconic muscle car was introduced in 1966 for the 1967 model year. This model was rated at 290 horsepower for insurance purposes, but really put out closer to 400 near its 7000 rpm redline.

Chevy Camaro Z/28

Shelby GT350

Ford Mustang GT

Plymouth Satellite 426

Chevy Camaro Z/28
A first-generation Chevy Camaro Z/28 is shown here. The platform and many important components of these early vehicles were shared with the Pontiac Firebird of the same year. A Chevrolet executive defined “Camaro” as a “small, violent animal that eats Mustangs” when asked to define the term.

The production of this rear-engined, air-cooled sports car classic began in 1963 and continues today. It has won practically every major endurance race, making it the most successful sports racing car of all time.

Iso Grifo

BMW 2000CS

Porsche 911

Mercedes-Benz GTR

Porsche 911
In the late 1960s, the iconic Porsche 911 won the 24 Hours of Le Mans and dominated the Trans Am series.

Twilight Sentinel, the first commercially produced automated headlight function, debuted on this top-end model in 1960. This year, Chrome VentiPorts were also released.

Chevrolet Impala

Buick Electra

Cadillac Calais

Plymouth Barracuda

Buick Electra
Until 1990, the full-size Buick Electra was produced in six incarnations.

In 1967, this “gentleman’s muscle automobile” was unveiled. The “Super Commando 440” had a 7.2 Liter V8 engine that came standard.

Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

Pontiac Tempest

Plymouth GTX

AMC Javelin

Plymouth GTX
The Plymouth GTX was a trim range of the Belvedere that was manufactured until 1971. The letters “G” and “T” stand for “Grand Touring,” and the letter “X” is simply an X.

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